Aquamation, or water cremation, is the sustainable form of burial

Aquamation, or water cremation, is the sustainable form of burial

Some gangster films involve dissolving the victims’ bodies in acid or alkali. The horroristic criminal solution turned out to actually be an environmentally friendly form of burial.

The international community adopted the method of aquamation, i.e. water cremation, when Desmond Tutu, a Nobel Peace Prize-winning South African Anglican church leader and human rights activist, who called climate change one of the greatest moral challenges of our time, called for alkaline hydrolysis, also known as aquamation, instead of cremation. because this is an environmentally friendly final placement for his body. In alkaline hydrolysis, the human body is enclosed in a long stainless steel chamber through which a heated solution of 95 percent water and 5 percent sodium hydroxide passes. In low-temperature alkaline hydrolysis, the temperature of the solution is just below the boiling point, the process takes place at atmospheric pressure, and the body is reduced in 14-16 hours. In a higher-temperature version of the process, where the mixture rises above 150 degrees Celsius and creates more pressure, the body melts in 4-6 hours. The process dissolves bonds in the body’s tissues, ultimately resulting in a sterile, liquid mixture of amino acids, peptides, salts, sugars and soaps – reported Smithsonian magazine. After the procedure, the sterile liquid is released from the machine and cooled, which contains the most basic building blocks of all living organisms: amino acids, peptides, sugars and salts. However, this fluid does not contain DNA or genetic material. After filtering, it can be scattered in the memorial garden or destroyed as normal surgical waste. After draining the liquid, the bones are rinsed and carefully removed from the container, and then left to air dry for a few days. The bones are extremely fragile in this case. Similar to traditional cremation, these remains are placed in an incinerator and the resulting pure white ashes are returned to the next of kin. Families can then put the ashes in an urn, bury them or scatter them in the traditional way. Alkaline hydrolysis is a rare burial practice today. It was first introduced to the public just over a decade ago, but is now licensed and regulated in 26 US states. It is primarily used in North America, where it is unknown to most people who have lost a loved one or are interested in what happens to their body when they die. Despite this, early adopters such as Tutu draw attention to its potential, and supporters argue that some traditional procedures (embalming, cremation) are long overdue to be replaced by more environmentally friendly methods. One of the appeals of alkaline hydrolysis is that it accelerates the natural decomposition of the corpse. The procedure does a good job of breaking down chemotherapy drugs and any other drugs that were in the body, and even embalmed corpses can be dissolved this way because it also eliminates the embalming chemicals. Americans bury an estimated 800,000 gallons, or more than 3 million liters, of formaldehyde each year with their embalmed loved ones, which is terribly polluting. The aquamation method is not currently practiced in Europe, but its introduction was discussed in the Benelux countries years ago. However, the situation is changing, which is clearly shown by the fact that the other day in the official journal of the European Union, a decision was published on the application of a German funeral company, which wanted it as a trademark register the word “aquamation”.Hardware, software, tests, interesting and colorful news from the world of IT by clicking here!

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